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Have Dream, Will Travel for Medical Technologist Jobs

Experienced Med Tech Making the Most of Travel Experiences

By Megan Murdock Krischke, contributor

Calvin Krajniak, CLT (HHS), MLT (ASCP), sees his work as a traveling medical technologist, or med tech, as the fulfillment of a dream he’d had for two decades.

Calvin Krajniak, medical technologist, is passionate about traveling

“I’d known about the possibility of traveling as a med tech since the early ‘90s, and had always been interested in doing it because I get bored doing the same job over and over. When my life circumstances freed me up, I jumped at the chance. I like the challenge traveling creates and I want to see new places, people and things,” explained Krajniak, who works travel medical technologist jobs with Club Staffing, an AMN Healthcare company.

Medical technologists must earn a bachelors’ degree in their field, complete a one-year residency and pass an exam before they can work independently. Certification from an accredited training program may be required. On the job, med techs draw blood and test and analyze blood, urine, stool and other bodily fluid samples. Most med tech jobs are in hospitals, although there are also positions at clinics and in research laboratories.

Medical technologists have primary responsibility for interpreting test results and reporting to physicians, and may supervise medical laboratory technicians, who perform more basic tests and laboratory procedures. Medical lab technicians normally need an associate’s degree and associated credentials.

“We currently have several jobs available for medical technologists and medical laboratory technicians,” noted Melissa Dingee, senior recruiting consultant with Club Staffing. “The most common location for laboratory travel opportunities is California, but we also have several needs in Massachusetts, Hawaii and Nevada.”

“We have jobs in large cities, like Boston and Honolulu, and then more rural locations like Kemmerer, Wyoming,” she continued. “We are usually able to keep our lab techs consistently employed if they are flexible with shift and location.”

This med tech’s traveling experience

Krajniak grew up in a Michigan town of 300 people and prefers to take assignments in smaller towns. As a med tech traveler, he has worked in Wilmington, Del.; Conrad, Poulson and Wolf Point, Mont.; Maryville, Mo.; and Colebrook, N.H.  He is currently working at a research facility in Indianapolis--a position he chose because of its proximity to his son. He said that he often extends his contracts and has had the pleasure of working with a lot of great people.

When considering new travel medical technologist jobs, Krajniak evaluates how his skills can serve the patient population and increase the credibility of the assignment facility. He also prefers small hospitals, so he gives those facilities priority.

“Working in various labs, I’ve learned that there are 100 ways to do any given job, and I’ve tried to learn as many of those different ways as I can,” he remarked. “I’ve been a tech for almost 30 years.  There is a lot of information available now that wasn’t when I was in school. In addition to continuing education, I don’t mind learning from younger techs who keep me updated on the new stuff that is out there.”

“Traveling, I have learned that people are the same wherever you go--they all have the same needs and desires,” he reflected.

Krajniak says his favorite thing about his med tech jobs is helping people--whether it is reassuring a two-year-old girl during her first blood draw or caring for a geriatric patient who doesn’t understand what is happening.

“Calvin is a wonderful traveler because of his flexibility and great attitude,” exuded Dingee. “He is always willing to dive right into any setting and help the facility in any way possible…He gets along well with others, always has a positive attitude and exemplifies professionalism. He also takes advantage of each location by checking out the local attractions and often shares pictures of his adventures.”

One of Krajniak’s favorite experiences as a med tech traveler was visiting Glacier National Park in Montana.

“My friend and I took 750 pictures during a weekend there. We saw waterfalls, hiked to a glacier, and were within 20 feet of wild mountain goats and their kids. I never would have gone there if it weren’t for traveling,” he exuded. “On other assignments I got to swim in the ocean, and I saw a moose in New Hampshire.”

“My advice for anyone who is considering traveling is that you be sure that you are professionally ready for it. Often you need to feel confident working independently in a week or less. If you can take on the challenge to learn their procedures and do it quickly, they will look at you like you are a saint,” Krajniak encouraged.

“Also, find someone you are comfortable with and go exploring,” he continued. “Don’t let the opportunity to experience a new place pass you by.”

Dingee encourages other medical technologists and medical lab technicians to experience the flexibility and freedom that travel healthcare provides. “You will get to meet so many new, interesting people, see wonderful locations all over the U.S., and learn new and exciting ways to work in the lab. You will also have opportunities to share your knowledge with others and make great money! We also offer benefits, housing and travel accommodations…Why wait?”


Medical technologists now have a golden opportunity to advance their careers with clinical laboratory scientist (CLS) jobs in California, with assistance from Club Staffing! Or check out our current medical technologist jobs and medical laboratory technician jobs today.



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