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Allied News July 13, 2018

4 Myths About Home Health Travel Jobs

Are you avoiding a lucrative career change because you're buying into home health travel job myths? Check out the real story below. Once you dispel some of these false claims, visit Club Staffing's home health travel jobs listing to find your next position. 

4 THINGS YOU MIGHT HAVE HEARD ABOUT HOME HEALTH TRAVEL JOBS THAT AREN'T FACTUAL 

1. It's dangerous to go into patient homes 

Home health workers do have to be vigilant, and they face risks that you might not see in a hospital or facility setting. "One time I had a patient's dog try to bite me," says former home health nurse Sue Menard. "And I had a car accident on the way to a patient's home once." But these extra risks don't necessarily equate to extreme danger, and therapists and other healthcare workers face other risks in facilities. 

Home health travel jobs let you explore a variety of cities and put your skills to the test facing all kinds of challenges. That requires preparation. Some tips for staying safe on the job so you can enjoy the many benefits of travel healthcare work include: 

  • ▪ Following safety practices from your employer 
  • ▪ Keeping communication open and always carrying a well-charged cell phone 
  • ▪ Researching your cases and where you'll be working ahead of time 
  • ▪ Keeping visitations to daytime hours when possible 

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2. You get paid less for home health travel jobs

The opposite is actually true: home health travel jobs tend to pay more than their permanent, facility-based brethren. Check out details on how much physical therapy travel jobs pay in various locations to see what type of numbers we're talking about. 

3. Companies overwhelm you with work 

Menard points out that healthcare workers in any position may find themselves overwhelmed by the workload on occasion. "Whether it's nurses or therapists, there just aren't always enough people to go around," she says. "Sometimes you end up taking on extra work because there just isn't anyone to do it and the patient needs help." 

But well-run companies plan ahead for home health travel jobs whenever possible, and they don't purposefully overload therapists and other staff. "No one wants healthcare workers doing more than they actually can," says Menard. "That makes for more errors and can hurt the patient and the company." 

Before accepting a home health travel job, ask about patient loads, assignment management, time off, hours required and other policies that let you understand whether you'll be able to maintain a work-life balance. 

4. You'll get lonely being by yourself too much 

If you choose home health travel jobs that let you see other parts of the country, you may be away from friends and family for periods at a time. That's a trade off you make for benefits like higher pay, adventure and new career challenges. But it doesn't mean you'll be lonely. 

Home health workers often make new friends in the cities where they work, and some have extensive networks all across the country after working in multiple locations. 

Plus, you can put social media and tools like Skype to work keeping up with the folks back home. 

Home health travel jobs are a great way to see new places and advance your career, so don't buy into the myths that might scare you away from these great opportunities.

Chart your path to home health travel jobs by connecting with a Club Staffing recruiter. To move the process along, make sure to APPLY NOW so you'll be ready to accept any new home health travel jobs that are right for your experience and career goals. 

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